Bourbon is a type of American Whiskey made primarily from Corn. The whiskey is most commonly associating with Kentucky and Tennessee. 

the story of bourbon

Bourbon, also known as American whiskey, is one of the world’s best-loved liquors thanks to its sweet, smoky flavours and incredible versatility.

It is typically made from mash bill of corn, rye, wheat, and barley, and must be aged in new charred oak barrels to impart the distinctive wood and vanilla notes for which bourbon is famed.

Though it is now an extremely popular spirit, bourbon has been on a long, complex journey to reach its current stardom, beginning way, way back in the 18th century….

OUR BOURBONS

1700s

The precise origins of bourbon are hard to pin down, but we know that the first bottles were produced in the late 1700s. America was introduced to whiskey by Scottish and Irish immigrants much earlier in the century, but the liquor would only gain its unique American style following some local adaptations.

Firstly, corn became the main ingredient in whiskey thanks to its abundant growth in the Southern states. Second comes the matter of barrels. Many believe Elijah Craig was the first to age bourbon in charred oak barrels, while others attribute this nifty idea to a variety of different distillers.

1800s

American whiskey was officially given the name ‘bourbon’ in 1840, by which time there were many distilleries producing the spirit to great commercial success. Some of the earliest distillers continue to thrive today, such as Elijah Craig, Jim Beam, and Maker’s Mark.

Because bourbon was easy to produce and cheaper to purchase than imported alcohol, it quickly became one of America’s most popular drinks.

1920-1933

Bourbon is cancelled! In passing the 18th Amendment, US congress prohibited all manufacturing and selling of alcohol. The vast majority of bourbon distilleries were forced to shut down and very few managed to reopen when Prohibition lifted in 1933.

Even after the Amendment was repealed, bourbon struggled to make a comeback due to The Great Depression and World War II causing nationwide grain rationing.

1960s

With the American government keen to reinstate bourbon as a national treasure, Congress officially declared it to be “America’s Native Spirit” in 1964.

The legal regulations which are still used in bourbon production were also established, with high standards of quality ensuring its return as the country’s most celebrated export.

Jack Daniels Whiskey Bourbon

tODAY

Despite this difficult journey, bourbon is now one of the world’s favourite spirits. Jack Daniels, a Tennessee Bourbon, even stands as the most widely drunk whiskey worldwide.

In 2007, the United States declared that September would be recognised as National Bourbon Heritage Month, allowing for an appreciation of the craftsmanship and expertise that goes into creating this brilliant industry. So, it’s recommended that you celebrate in style this September with a glass of fine American whiskey!